1. Australian House & Garden 1975
via Fears and Kahn
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    Australian House & Garden 1975

    via Fears and Kahn

    (Source: flickr.com)

  2. Sarah LazarovicThe Buyerarchy of Needs

This and others will be collected by Penguin in a forthcoming book of visual essays, entitled A Bunch of Pretty Things I Did Not Buy, based on the year Lazarovic spent painting all the things she liked instead of buying them. [via Ecouterre]
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    Sarah Lazarovic
    The Buyerarchy of Needs

    This and others will be collected by Penguin in a forthcoming book of visual essays, entitled A Bunch of Pretty Things I Did Not Buy, based on the year Lazarovic spent painting all the things she liked instead of buying them. [via Ecouterre]

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  4. 
"Carpet is the icon of Eastern tradition, it’s canonical and has visual boundaries. My art is directed towards transforming these boundaries beyond any recognition. To be honest, things I do are now always right and beautiful ones, I do it without thinking, it’s my instantaneous expression. Same changes happen in the world of today each day - ideas that have been formed for ages are being changed in moments." — Faig Ahmed
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    "Carpet is the icon of Eastern tradition, it’s canonical and has visual boundaries. My art is directed towards transforming these boundaries beyond any recognition. To be honest, things I do are now always right and beautiful ones, I do it without thinking, it’s my instantaneous expression. Same changes happen in the world of today each day - ideas that have been formed for ages are being changed in moments." Faig Ahmed

    (Source: aestheticgoddess, via fletter)

  5. Mad Men Style in 1/6 Scale

    With the whole internet all abuzz about Mad Men coming back this weekend, I thought it timely to highlight the work of one of my favorite dollhouse artisans, Maryann Roy.

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    Maryann handcrafts original sets/dioramas, furniture and accessories in 1/6 scale (aka “playscale” [which is the scale Barbie dolls glamorously live in]), but from looking at photos of her staged rooms (albeit without dolls posed in them), you’d never know her designs aren’t made for humans. Her Neo Retro miniature interiors look like they could be the actual Hollywood sets of Mad Men. She’s so good, in fact, that her miniature interpretation of Joan Holloway’s apartment, “Flowers for Joan,” won 1st prize in 2010 for Mattel’s Mad Men photo contest, in conjunction with the release of their line of limited edition Mad Men character dolls.

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  6. Look for These 5 Signs of Quality Workmanship in Vintage Furniture

    THIS POST IS SO GOOD. Very helpful tips to read before your next trip to the flea market or thrift store. Old stuff was built to last, and if you can find something of good quality, you can use it forever.

  7. Eero Saarinen, Miller House Columbus, Indiana, 1957 Photographed by Ezra Stoller[Image source]
DEAR LORD WONT YOU BUY ME A SUNKEN LIVING ROOM 
(click photo to zoom in and see the sunken living room in all it’s glory)
AND BTW GOD, I DON’T MEAN LIKE, SENDING DOWN A COMET THAT PUTS A GIANT HOLE IN THE FLOOR OF MY CURRENT LIVING ROOM, I KNOW HOW YOU WORK SMART GUY AND IT CAN BE PRETTY TWISTED SOMETIMES.
(Previously in sunken rooms)
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    Eero Saarinen, Miller House
    Columbus, Indiana, 1957 
    Photographed by Ezra Stoller
    [Image source]

    DEAR LORD WONT YOU BUY ME A SUNKEN LIVING ROOM 

    (click photo to zoom in and see the sunken living room in all it’s glory)

    AND BTW GOD, I DON’T MEAN LIKE, SENDING DOWN A COMET THAT PUTS A GIANT HOLE IN THE FLOOR OF MY CURRENT LIVING ROOM, I KNOW HOW YOU WORK SMART GUY AND IT CAN BE PRETTY TWISTED SOMETIMES.

    (Previously in sunken rooms)

  8. From the book A-frame, by Chad Randl
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    From the book A-frame, by Chad Randl

    (Source: oldchum)

  9. Throwback Thursday - Capitol Records Edition

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    Me in the hallway of the Capitol Records building, Los Angeles, 2010

    You can revisit my extensive photo tour of the offices and studios (and the views from the rooftop) right here. That was a really fun day.

  10. Wallpaper by Wook Kim

  11. Houseplants on Holiday

    Going on vacation and don’t want your plant friends to die? Here’s how to give your plants a vacation… from you!

    This is what G and I do when we go away - from a weekend to a week - we create a sort-of mini greenhouse on our dining table.

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    We buy a bunch of those 99¢ aluminum pans from the dollar store, and place them atop the table. Fill the pans up with water and place the potted plants inside. The idea is for the water in the pan to get up into the plant from the bottom, via the little hole in the bottom of the pot. The other idea is, if your plants permanent residence is on a sunny windowsill, you gotta get them the hell out of there - being in direct sunlight when no one is there to water them regularly will cause them to wilt and feel bad about themselves. You have to get them all into the center of the room. They love this, BTW, because then they can all hang out together and talk shit about you while you are away. It’s really beneficial to give them this opportunity once in a while.

    Then, depending on what kind of plant it is, it gets covered in plastic wrap, using skewers or bamboo to tent the plastic over the plant, leaves and all. This creates the mini greenhouse. Get that moisture on lock. Make sure to pop a few holes in the plastic so the plant can breathe. **Only do the plastic tent for regular plants tho - not succulents or cacti - they will die in these conditions. Succulents + moisture = death. Don’t believe me? Ask the Sill.** Alternatively, if you don’t want to cover the whole plant, you can put plastic wrap just over the soil. Really, the most important part is that those plants are sitting in a pan of water.

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    Be sure to give the plants a good soaking before you depart. While you are away, they are gonna slowly soak up all that water and let me tell you, when you come home and unveil the plastic wrap, your plants are going to be GREEN AS F**K. Like, organic farmers market grade Lacinato kale dark green. All the leaves will plump up like they had collagen injections. I am telling you.

    This process will save your plants asses for over a week - maybe even longer. The longest we left them in this state was about nine days. When we came home, the plants looked better than they did when we left. 

    Another helpful tip on how to care for your plants when going on vacation is to ask your little sister to come over and chill with them. I recently tried that and it was super successful. She even did the dishes we left behind. If you don’t have a little sister, you can scan your contacts list to see if there is anyone else who would do basically anything for you and ask for nothing in return because you have an unbreakable bond and are allies for life.

    Does anyone else have any other helpful tips on caring for houseplants while on vacation? Please let me know if you do, because I am all about sharing new experiences with my plants.

    P.S. Sorry these pix are so bad - I snapped them on my cell phone in somewhat of a hurry on my way to the airport.

    P.T.P.S. (PRO-TIP-POST-SCRIPT): These things blow. You cannot possibly imagine how difficult it is to get water into the teeeeeeny tiny little hole. And they are fragile as f**k, very breakable. Also, ugly. We have two of them but they are worthless. Do not leave your plants life in the hands of this product.

  12. File this under both Unforgettable Images and Mysteries Solved, with credit to Wary Meyers Instagram, I now know the source of this unforgettable image is Richard Ohrbach’s Manhattan duplex, from a 1973 issue of Architectural Digest. Mystery solved. It looks better with nude models posed on it tho.
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    File this under both Unforgettable Images and Mysteries Solved, with credit to Wary Meyers Instagram, I now know the source of this unforgettable image is Richard Ohrbach’s Manhattan duplex, from a 1973 issue of Architectural Digest. Mystery solved. It looks better with nude models posed on it tho.

  13. Here is a preview of the living room redecorating project I mentioned in my previous post. It’s still in the early stages, but 97% of the gallery wall has been installed. The client has a terrific collection of NYC-centric photography and street art that needed to be prominently displayed. The whole room is gonna be dope when completed and I can’t wait to share the finished result with you here.
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    Here is a preview of the living room redecorating project I mentioned in my previous post. It’s still in the early stages, but 97% of the gallery wall has been installed. The client has a terrific collection of NYC-centric photography and street art that needed to be prominently displayed. The whole room is gonna be dope when completed and I can’t wait to share the finished result with you here.

  14. Above, the September 1948 cover of House & Garden featuring classic Mid-century paint colors. I just used a Kingfisher blue in a living room redecorating project I’m working on, but it didn’t look no kinda thing like the example above. While I think it is a pretty color, I don’t know if I would have selected the 1948 version of Kingfisher in 2014 for the room I’m doing now. The one we chose is much darker, and more gray, like this:

Speaking of color history, later this month I will be attending a thematic exploration of the evolution of color and pigment throughout art history at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I cannot wait. The tour will be lead by Curious Methods, a NYC-based museum company that crafts custom museum experiences based on the history of a particular subject, interest or field. I opted for the theme of COLOR, which is described as a dive into where individual colors come from and how they’ve dramatically changed over time. I am SO excited to nerd out at the Met on the study of color - I mean, just think about how we started out with basically like two colors (red and black, as in, stone age artists drawing on the walls with mud/blood), and then imagine the paint section at Home Depot and what we’re working with now. Did you know that for four centuries there was a paint pigment made from the ground-up remains of ancient Egyptian Mummies? For real. Both human and feline. It was known as Mummy Brown. The Pre-Raphaelites LOVED it. It was well-suited for shadows, flesh tones and long brown hair, I guess. Then finally in the 1920s-30s, some sensible person came along and was like you guys we need to NOT be making paint out of these super sacred dead bodies anymore. For further reading on Mummy Brown (and more about the frightening mummy-trade of centuries past), check out The Journal of Art in Society. And Hyperallergic has some great stories on other obsolete pigments. It’s amazing how far color has come! I look forward to reporting back after the museum experience and promise to share any juicy bits of color history I learn.
    High Res

    Above, the September 1948 cover of House & Garden featuring classic Mid-century paint colors. I just used a Kingfisher blue in a living room redecorating project I’m working on, but it didn’t look no kinda thing like the example above. While I think it is a pretty color, I don’t know if I would have selected the 1948 version of Kingfisher in 2014 for the room I’m doing now. The one we chose is much darker, and more gray, like this:

    Speaking of color history, later this month I will be attending a thematic exploration of the evolution of color and pigment throughout art history at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I cannot wait. The tour will be lead by Curious Methods, a NYC-based museum company that crafts custom museum experiences based on the history of a particular subject, interest or field. I opted for the theme of COLOR, which is described as a dive into where individual colors come from and how they’ve dramatically changed over time. I am SO excited to nerd out at the Met on the study of color - I mean, just think about how we started out with basically like two colors (red and black, as in, stone age artists drawing on the walls with mud/blood), and then imagine the paint section at Home Depot and what we’re working with now. Did you know that for four centuries there was a paint pigment made from the ground-up remains of ancient Egyptian Mummies? For real. Both human and feline. It was known as Mummy Brown. The Pre-Raphaelites LOVED it. It was well-suited for shadows, flesh tones and long brown hair, I guess. Then finally in the 1920s-30s, some sensible person came along and was like you guys we need to NOT be making paint out of these super sacred dead bodies anymore. For further reading on Mummy Brown (and more about the frightening mummy-trade of centuries past), check out The Journal of Art in Society. And Hyperallergic has some great stories on other obsolete pigments. It’s amazing how far color has come! I look forward to reporting back after the museum experience and promise to share any juicy bits of color history I learn.

    (Source: madformidcentury.com)

  15. Hilla Shamia
    Wood Casting
    Molten Aluminum and Charred Wood
    2012

    The molten aluminum chars the area of the wood it comes into contact with darkening it and creating a stark contrast against this relatively light colored metal. The charring also causes further splitting in the wood which the molten aluminum can penetrate in its liquid form and form a strong bond with as it solidifies. [source (this link has some great pictures of the process btw)]

    The designer creates these incredibly unique pieces of furniture by pouring molten aluminum onto the rounded, bark side of square sawn timber. They were shown at Milan Design Week 2012, and I’m not sure if they are still available for purchase (especially in the US). But she has listed two shops in Italy and Israel on her website if you are determined to acquire one! They are each so gorgeous, and so GNARLY. You go with your bad ass furniture, Hilla.

    (Source: designboom.com)