1. pacegallery:

Art Books for Kids: Published in 2013 by Princeton Architectural Press, Alexander Calder: Meet the Artist! is a new children’s book by Patricia Geis. With its bright colors, pop-ups, and cutouts, this book introduces its young readers to Alexander Calder and his whimsical use of wire.
To learn more about the Meet the Artist! series, read this New York Times book review. To purchase the book, please visit the LACMA store. 
    High Res

    pacegallery:

    Art Books for Kids: Published in 2013 by Princeton Architectural Press, Alexander Calder: Meet the Artist! is a new children’s book by Patricia Geis. With its bright colors, pop-ups, and cutouts, this book introduces its young readers to Alexander Calder and his whimsical use of wire.

    To learn more about the Meet the Artist! series, read this New York Times book review. To purchase the book, please visit the LACMA store

  2. When I read that it was Alexander Calder’s birthday this week, I was compelled to share this old photograph of little me climbing out of my mom’s old Saab in a Calder tee on my old block. Obvs I would have been heavily influenced by whatever my parents exposed me to, but Calder was one of the first artists I became a fan of - what perfect art for children to appreciate - the wire figures, mobiles and stabiles seem meant for engaging in play. Some of my earliest art memories are of trying to grab at works by Calder. I got the shirt from a 1984 Calder exhibition at the Whitney Museum at Philip Morris (in the 1980s, the Whitney installed satellite museums in the lobbies of several office buildings in midtown Manhattan). And that red checkered smock dress, funny story, originally belonged to one of my dolls - an enormous Raggedy Ann-like thing with long strings of yarn for hair, which I used to teach myself how to braid. I took the dress from the doll because (1) it totally fit me and (2) it reminded me of what I thought were the most impressive costumes, or rather, uniforms, that I saw on the little girls who attended primary school at Sacred Heart, which was a block away from where I went to school. Red gingham pinafores over charcoal grey jumpers and white Peter Pan collar blouses. I thought it was so proper, such a good look. I can’t imagine any girl who actually went there would reminisce quite as fondly -  that layered getup, in any of its seasonal variants, was probably uncomfortable as can be all year round. Lady Gaga went to Sacred Heart, so you know she wore it. And Suri Cruise is currently enrolled there, so I bet she’ll eventually try to find a way to get around wearing it. My yuppie+hippie progressive school did not mandate anything close to a dress code, so I could put on a dress made for a doll over a t-shirt, never brush my hair, velcro my shoes and be on my merry way. But for a time I was very curious about (and maybe slightly envious of) the formal, complicated/antiquated, standardized outfits that kids who went to stricter schools had to wear every day. I didn’t realize how good I had it till a few years later, when I began my freshman year of high school in the more conservative area of upstate NY. My idea of an acceptable outfit was not in line with my new peers, and I got made fun of so bad for the first couple of years. But I endured, and the experience instilled such strong pride in the ownership of individuality, that I have to wonder what my life would have been like had I gone to an elementary school that required students to wear uniforms. Probably different.
This has been fashion reflections with Eloise Moorehead.
    High Res

    When I read that it was Alexander Calder’s birthday this week, I was compelled to share this old photograph of little me climbing out of my mom’s old Saab in a Calder tee on my old block. Obvs I would have been heavily influenced by whatever my parents exposed me to, but Calder was one of the first artists I became a fan of - what perfect art for children to appreciate - the wire figures, mobiles and stabiles seem meant for engaging in play. Some of my earliest art memories are of trying to grab at works by Calder. I got the shirt from a 1984 Calder exhibition at the Whitney Museum at Philip Morris (in the 1980s, the Whitney installed satellite museums in the lobbies of several office buildings in midtown Manhattan). And that red checkered smock dress, funny story, originally belonged to one of my dolls - an enormous Raggedy Ann-like thing with long strings of yarn for hair, which I used to teach myself how to braid. I took the dress from the doll because (1) it totally fit me and (2) it reminded me of what I thought were the most impressive costumes, or rather, uniforms, that I saw on the little girls who attended primary school at Sacred Heart, which was a block away from where I went to school. Red gingham pinafores over charcoal grey jumpers and white Peter Pan collar blouses. I thought it was so proper, such a good look. I can’t imagine any girl who actually went there would reminisce quite as fondly -  that layered getup, in any of its seasonal variants, was probably uncomfortable as can be all year round. Lady Gaga went to Sacred Heart, so you know she wore it. And Suri Cruise is currently enrolled there, so I bet she’ll eventually try to find a way to get around wearing it. My yuppie+hippie progressive school did not mandate anything close to a dress code, so I could put on a dress made for a doll over a t-shirt, never brush my hair, velcro my shoes and be on my merry way. But for a time I was very curious about (and maybe slightly envious of) the formal, complicated/antiquated, standardized outfits that kids who went to stricter schools had to wear every day. I didn’t realize how good I had it till a few years later, when I began my freshman year of high school in the more conservative area of upstate NY. My idea of an acceptable outfit was not in line with my new peers, and I got made fun of so bad for the first couple of years. But I endured, and the experience instilled such strong pride in the ownership of individuality, that I have to wonder what my life would have been like had I gone to an elementary school that required students to wear uniforms. Probably different.

    This has been fashion reflections with Eloise Moorehead.

  3. artnewsmag:


Man in Wire:
Alexander Calder, Babe Ruth, ca. 1936. From a show of Calder’s portraits of Calvin Coolidge, Fernand Léger, Jean-Paul Sartre at the National Portrait Gallery.

    artnewsmag:

    Man in Wire:

    Alexander Calder, Babe Ruth, ca. 1936. From a show of Calder’s portraits of Calvin Coolidge, Fernand Léger, Jean-Paul Sartre at the National Portrait Gallery.

    (Source: niborama)

  4. We recently hung this new dream catcher at home.
G won it for me at Coney Island.

Dreams do come true.
    High Res

    We recently hung this new dream catcher at home.

    G won it for me at Coney Island.

    Dreams do come true.

  5. "Oh, hello. Fancy running into you here. As you can see, I’ve got mine." — History’s Smuggest Brides: Vintage Engagement Photos That Perfectly Embody The Spirit Of
    “I Got Mine”

    I don’t know if it is evident on my face from the photos above, but that phrase was pretty much my inner mantra throughout this shoot, as well as the first thing that came out of G’s mouth when the photographer asked us to make each other laugh for a shot (<— yet another reason why I am marrying him). It was just the thing to help remind us that this (‘this’ being posing for pictures in a public place among crowds of strangers) was not actually a big deal. Because as soon as the fancy cameras and lenses came out, we were both kinda like, omg omg omfg. But we figured out pretty quickly that not one of those strangers was paying the least bit of attention to us anyway, so who cares! We got over ourselves and had the best time. Presenting the first installment of my take on wedding bloggery, which will be sporadically happening over the next 11 months. If any one of you has good reason for hating this shit, unfollow now or forever hold your peace.

    Read More

  6. bohoastro:

    BIRTHDAY BOHEMIAN ….. Alexander Calder

    American artist and sculptor Alexander Calder was most famous for inventing the mobile. He was born on July 22 1898 when the Sun was in the last degree of Cancer, which gave him a great love of home, family and children.  With his Moon and Venus in Virgo he had an earthy, practical side and, with his Mars in Gemini, he was extremely versatile … his creative output included paintings, sculptures, mobiles, stage sets, lithographs, toys, tapestries and jewellery, plus he also designed carpets.

    The photos above show his beautiful home and studio in Connecticut … a unique and magical place that gives us an insight into his colourful, creative and chaotic mind!

    Photos from Calder at Home : The Joyous Environment of Alexander Calder by Pedro E. Guerrero

    Happy almost-would-have-been-your-116th-Birthday to Sandy Calder

    (via bohoastro)