1. Hand carved wooden house plants by Yuto Yamasaki

    (Source: thefoxisblack.com)

  2. Stanislaus Souten Longley (1884-1966) Under the Stars Pencil, watercolor and bodycolor on paper 16 ½ x 13 in. (41.9 x 33 cm.)

Born in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, Longley, a poster designer, studied at the Regent Street Polytechnic School of Art under Harry Watson. It has been suggested that the present work may have been a design for the London Underground.
Source: Christie’s London - The Neil Wilson Collection: A Romantic Vision
    High Res

    Stanislaus Souten Longley (1884-1966)
    Under the Stars
    Pencil, watercolor and bodycolor on paper
    16 ½ x 13 in. (41.9 x 33 cm.)

    Born in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, Longley, a poster designer, studied at the Regent Street Polytechnic School of Art under Harry Watson. It has been suggested that the present work may have been a design for the London Underground.

    Source: Christie’s London - The Neil Wilson Collection: A Romantic Vision

  3. Charles Heathcote Tatham (1772-1842)StoolMade in England, ca. 1800Beechwood, painted to imitate marbleV&A Museum

Charles Heathcote Tatham (1772-1842), the designer of this stool, arrived in Rome in July 1794. He stayed for two years gathering material for his designs of ornamental architecture and furniture. While in Italy, Tatham not only drew and sketched, he also bought a large number of antique fragments for his employer and mentor, Henry Holland (1745-1806) who was architect to the Prince of Wales.The design of this stool was inspired by a drawing of a classical Roman marble seat illustrated by Tatham and published in his book ‘Etchings of Ancient Ornamental Architecture drawn from the Originals in Rome and other Parts of Italy’, 1799. Tatham’s book was an immediate success, providing British designers with ideas for furniture and decoration in the Revival styles. A second and third edition were issued in 1803 and 1810 respectively, and the style of linear engravings it employed was copied by Thomas Hope in Household Furniture and Interior Decoration in 1807.The form of this stool closely follows that of an ancient marble seat in Rome. Here the stool is made from beech wood, painted in white and grey to simulate the appearance of marble. Beech wood would have been much easier and less costly to carve than marble, and resulted in a more flexible seat which weighed less and could be moved around without difficulty. The seat was painted white and gold during this century, but has now partly been stripped to reveal the original marbled paintwork. The stool is one of a pair from the Neave Collection at Dagenham Park, Essex. The pair to it is at Temple Newsam House, Leeds. [source]
    High Res

    Charles Heathcote Tatham (1772-1842)
    Stool
    Made in England, ca. 1800
    Beechwood, painted to imitate marble
    V&A Museum

    Charles Heathcote Tatham (1772-1842), the designer of this stool, arrived in Rome in July 1794. He stayed for two years gathering material for his designs of ornamental architecture and furniture. While in Italy, Tatham not only drew and sketched, he also bought a large number of antique fragments for his employer and mentor, Henry Holland (1745-1806) who was architect to the Prince of Wales.

    The design of this stool was inspired by a drawing of a classical Roman marble seat illustrated by Tatham and published in his book ‘Etchings of Ancient Ornamental Architecture drawn from the Originals in Rome and other Parts of Italy’, 1799. Tatham’s book was an immediate success, providing British designers with ideas for furniture and decoration in the Revival styles. A second and third edition were issued in 1803 and 1810 respectively, and the style of linear engravings it employed was copied by Thomas Hope in Household Furniture and Interior Decoration in 1807.

    The form of this stool closely follows that of an ancient marble seat in Rome. Here the stool is made from beech wood, painted in white and grey to simulate the appearance of marble. Beech wood would have been much easier and less costly to carve than marble, and resulted in a more flexible seat which weighed less and could be moved around without difficulty. The seat was painted white and gold during this century, but has now partly been stripped to reveal the original marbled paintwork. The stool is one of a pair from the Neave Collection at Dagenham Park, Essex. The pair to it is at Temple Newsam House, Leeds. [source]

  4. Imagine you woke up in an old Bugatti tho

    Look at these bedroom suites by Italian designer Carlo Bugatti (1856-1940). I can’t even imagine what it would be like to wake up in one of his fantastical all-encompassing environments. When I look at his stuff, all I can think is that he was absolutely out of his damn mind - in such a wonderful way. You may recognize the bed pictured at the very top, it’s a Bugatti and was used as the sickbed of Lucy Westenra in Francis Ford Coppola’s 1992 film Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

    And I’m terribly sorry if I just got that song in your head. Here is a terrific read on the fascinating history of the whole Bugatti family to make up for it. OH AND ALSO - I am truly very grateful that someone else already covered this in such a way that I felt less alone like taking them out to coffee so we could discuss the subject further together.

    To explore more hip hop + fine art connections, please enjoy this dedicated Pinterest collaboration and these magnificent Tumblr blogs: flyartproductions and b4-16.

  5. Norman Bel Geddes Doll House for Joan Circa 1920s

In 1921, Bel Geddes designed a brownstone dollhouse as Christmas gift for his daughter Joan. The rectangular two-story dollhouse is made chiefly of painted wood. Throughout the home, rooms are accented with wood, metal, and enamel furnishings. Moving from front to back, the rooms are laid out as follows: The first floor has an entry room that connects to the second floor with a staircase, followed by a center room and a back room. The second floor has a front room with tall windows, a center room, and a bathroom in the back.The completed dollhouse was in the possession of the Geddes family until it was donated to the Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin in 2001. [source]
    High Res

    Norman Bel Geddes
    Doll House for Joan
    Circa 1920s

    In 1921, Bel Geddes designed a brownstone dollhouse as Christmas gift for his daughter Joan. The rectangular two-story dollhouse is made chiefly of painted wood. Throughout the home, rooms are accented with wood, metal, and enamel furnishings. Moving from front to back, the rooms are laid out as follows: The first floor has an entry room that connects to the second floor with a staircase, followed by a center room and a back room. The second floor has a front room with tall windows, a center room, and a bathroom in the back.

    The completed dollhouse was in the possession of the Geddes family until it was donated to the Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin in 2001. [source]

  6. loverofbeauty:

Holiday Magazine

    loverofbeauty:

    Holiday Magazine

    (Source: un-gif-dans-ta-gueule)