1. Raise your hand if you know where this room is located at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. In all the times I’ve taken some special friends on one of my personal-period-rooms-of-the-Met guided tours (I really do those, wanna go?), I have found a lot of people are not aware of this wonderful room by Frank Lloyd Wright. It’s the living room from the Little House, originally in Wayzata,  Minnesota, 1912–14. When the house was demolished in 1972, the living room was disassembled  and moved here, where it is now on  permanent display.
When you step inside, you are completely transported through time and space into a total environment. You are enveloped in quietness, and in FLW himself, as he designed every last element of the room. Possibly even the pottery (I think?). The room feels like a rhythmic, horizontal expanse of warm color, texture and wood, and would have been filled with light, as two sides of the rooms are curtain walls of classic FLW stained glass. It’s an incredibly peaceful space amidst the hum of the museum crowds. It’s not like, a secret or anything, but I’ve never been in there with more than two other people checking it out at the same time. I only wish I could sit on the furniture and relax awhile with a book. As you can see above, the sofa he designed with tabletop arms was pretty much built for that.
P.S. If you want to find this room, it’s on the first floor in the American Wing, near the back of the grand pavilion, toward the far right side.
Read more:  Frank  Lloyd Wright: Living room from the Little House, Wayzata, Minnesota  (1972.60.1) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan  Museum of Art
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    Raise your hand if you know where this room is located at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. In all the times I’ve taken some special friends on one of my personal-period-rooms-of-the-Met guided tours (I really do those, wanna go?), I have found a lot of people are not aware of this wonderful room by Frank Lloyd Wright. It’s the living room from the Little House, originally in Wayzata, Minnesota, 1912–14. When the house was demolished in 1972, the living room was disassembled and moved here, where it is now on permanent display.

    When you step inside, you are completely transported through time and space into a total environment. You are enveloped in quietness, and in FLW himself, as he designed every last element of the room. Possibly even the pottery (I think?). The room feels like a rhythmic, horizontal expanse of warm color, texture and wood, and would have been filled with light, as two sides of the rooms are curtain walls of classic FLW stained glass. It’s an incredibly peaceful space amidst the hum of the museum crowds. It’s not like, a secret or anything, but I’ve never been in there with more than two other people checking it out at the same time. I only wish I could sit on the furniture and relax awhile with a book. As you can see above, the sofa he designed with tabletop arms was pretty much built for that.

    P.S. If you want to find this room, it’s on the first floor in the American Wing, near the back of the grand pavilion, toward the far right side.

    Read more: Frank Lloyd Wright: Living room from the Little House, Wayzata, Minnesota (1972.60.1) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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